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in the riots. the sentences were handed down in the capital of cairo. their protests with clashes. it's in suez, and people have been killed to mark the second anniversary of the overthrow of hosni mubarak. perce this report from cairo. >> the death sentences were greeted with elation. that is what they wanted. the opposite reaction in were defendants are being held. those sentenced to death our followers are the local club appeared their fellow supporters took to the st. in in europe. attempt to storm the prison were in force in clouds of tear gas and gunfire. protesters and police were killed and dozens of others wounded. bac in cairo, it the fans of al- ahly gathered jubilantly in the stadium. some continue to insist the killings had a political dimension. >> we were among the first to support the revolution. we fought against mubarak and then against others. this was an act of retaliation by ministry forces because of this. amid the celebration one fundamental remains on answered. was there a conspiracy? to what degree can accountability be attached to the body in power at the time of the k
-- wonach's former leader has a -- egypt's former leader has won a retrial. our reporter is live in cairo. both mubarak and the prosecutors have won an appeal for a retrial. both parties wanted this. is that unusual? >> no, it is not unusual at all. this court is known to be a meticulous establishment. it looks at the procedures of the previous court, of the prosecution, and it does throw out previous convictions on procedural grounds. this does not come as a surprise at all. this means hosni mubarak will be having a fresh, new trial in which both files -- both sides can introduce new evidence. >> what was the court's's problem but the prosecution last time? what measures will be taken to ensure they have been stronger case this time? >> the court session today was quite brief. we will be keeping an eye to see what explanation the court has as to why it threw out the previous conviction. that has yet to be announced. there have been interesting developments happening in the past few days in egypt. there was a new fact-finding commission that was formed by president morsi. they have comple
days of the egyptian revolution. the tear gas was so intense it covered downtown cairo with plume of smoke. protesters are still angry with a police force that still has not changed it's ways and has not pulled back, and pulled a journalist hostage until activists were able to take him to hospital. the mean opposition blocked the president's invite. >> cenk: so we've had riots, 52 people killed. we had 178 arrested recently. those are protesters. now the curfew, and the basically marshal law affects three provinces in egypt. it is a nightly curfew and allows for military arrests of civilians. these are exactly the civil rights that they fought for. there was an attack for three state hours and no security showed up. that is fascinating. they sent out tweets saying sos if anyone knows anyone in military or police or government please send help. january 28th, egypt but no such help was sent for over three hours. in fact, they were eventually rescued by protesters. isn't that interesting? people that are unknown assailants go in, fire in the air, loot the hotel. as they do that en ma
-hour -- clashes in cairo. egypt marks the second anniversary of the revolution which ended the era of hosni mubarak. we will have a live report. >> and germany says it plans to buy its first killer drones. reaction in berlin. >> and the swiss architect awarded for his sense and sensibility with german castles. it was two years ago when the egyptians rose up in unity demanding an end to hosni mubarak's reign as president. today, mubarak is history, and egypt is a nation divided. m islamists hold power in the former president morsi, but some say his new constitution is just as unfair as the system and to replace. on friday, egyptians once again took to the streets. >> it was a day of protest, not a celebration. once again, tens of thousands of people gathered in cairo's tahrir square where two years ago they demonstrated against hosni mubarak. now they are demonstrating against the new president. the people want the downfall of the regime. the slogan of the arab spring is being chanted once again. this time they are telling morsi to go. >> our revolution continues. we will not allow one facti
two days. a day after nine people died in anti-government street demonstrations in cairo 32 were killed today rooted in the protest over the outcome of a mass murder trial but rooted in the country's still deep political division. we've been in the thick of some of those protests and start off tonight from cairo. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. you were here two years ago and saw the scenes back then. this was a country united behind one goal, to topple the dictator hosni mubarak but two years on this country is divided, polarized and for the first time many people here fear the violence is actually threatening the country's very stability. the chaotic moments when anger turned deadly in port saeed. outside the city's jail, dozens were killed as protesters tried to storm it to free prisoners who minutes earlier were sentenced to death in cairo. 21 defendants were convicted for their part in a soccer stadium massacre that killed more than 70 fans one year ago. the verdict was read and relatives of those killed last year showed grief and joy. for them the ruling wa
in central cairo. the president announced on sunday states of emergencies and curfews in three cities to try to stop the unrest. joining us mike, live from cairo. what happened in that fatal incident, mike? >> we are not sure of the exact specifics, but we do know that for the past five days there have been an ongoing series of skirmishes in the streets around the square, particularly those leading to the interior ministry, which has always been a particular target of anti- government protesters. the ministry itself barricaded itself for a number of months. those skirmishes have been ongoing for the past five days. there was one previous death reported in the past five skirmishes and now we have another. these sporadic clashes have been happening since the second anniversary of the revolution in various parts of cairo, generally very specific areas where protests have been flaring up and there has been teargas thrown by police with yet another fatality for those kinds of sporadic events within the city itself. >> of course, the government is concerned, the president has called on opposition
spot tonight. tahrir square in cairo. that's because it's been two years now since we were there to witness the fall of mubarak. tonight egyptians have filled the square once again to express their continuing anger and frustration. nbc's ayman mohyeldin has been in the thick of it. including the tear gas used to disperse the crowds. and while we have a shaky satellite signal tonight from our cairo bureau, he is there, nonetheless. ayman, good evening. eamon, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the temperatures have dropped. it's nighttime here, and so have the number of protesters in tahrir square where it is calming this evening after a very intense day of clashes, not too far away from the iconic birthplace of the egyptian revolution. where we are here in cairo, and in other cities, police have been clashing with protesters. many of them angry at the slow pace of transition to democracy under the leadership of mohamed morsi and his muslim brotherhood party. they say they have taken over the country and divided it. you were here two years ago. you saw the unity
. this after a court in the capital cairo sentenced to death 21 people accused of involvement in last year's stadium disaster in which 74 were killed. the court also set march 9 as the date for handing down the verdict on another 52 defendants in the case. there was an angry response from protesters, who stormed two police stations. many of them are supporters of the football club, who blame last year's violence on the police. the death sentences come after a day of clashes on friday that left at least seven people dead in over 400 others injured. that violence came as egypt marked the second anniversary of the operating against the regime of president hosni mubarak. >> cairo on saturday morning. after a long night of violent demonstrations and not just in the capital. troops clashed with anti- government protesters after they stormed the offices of the muslim brotherhood. eight deaths were reported their late friday. in tahrir square, thousands rally to mark the second anniversary of the revolution. they object to the new constitution and its reliance on islamic law and the desperate stat
in the smartphones market. >> it is 12:00 noon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, d.c., 2:00 p.m. in the cairo, on a ridge with significance. two years from the uprising that toppled the mubarak regime, egypt democratically elected president, muhammad morsi, faces his own challenge. here is a live shot from the tahrir square, where thousands are gathered. it has been a tumultuous two years for egypt, marked by political infighting, protests, a deepening economic crisis. critics of president morsi 1 radical change to egypt's new constitution. we can cross live now to cairo to our correspondent. it is the two-year anniversary. one might think that would be cause for celebration, but it seems the mood is different where you are in tahrir square. >> yes, it is. president morsi called for today to be a day for egyptians to come together in celebration, but it is a different scene in tahrir square. let me show you friday prayers a short while ago. the numbers are into the thousands. if you look up that street leading towards parliament, there have been clashes over there. we have seen tear-gas fired
morsi. he welcomed me to his presidential palace in cairo. and i toured the city's famous tahrir square, where the arab spring demonstrations changed the course of history. i stood in tahrir square days ago, the symbol of the revolution was largely deserted. it looked very different two years ago, during those intense days leading up to the overthrow of the egyptian president, hosni mubarak. tanks and armored vehicles, and snipers all over the place. hundreds of egyptian protesters killed. and then it was over. the arab spring had come to egypt. those were days of high optimism. i was in egypt with secretary of state hillary clinton a few weeks after the revolution. we walked around tahrir square with little security. egyptians were thrilled to see her. i remember the near euphoria when she went to the nearby u.s. ambassador to thank the american diplomats for all their hard work during those difficult days. >> madam secretary, what do you think about tahrir square? >> well, it was very exciting and moving for me to go to tahrir square and have some sense of what those amazing days must
. we will speak with sharif abdel kouddous from cairo, a protest march interfere and speak with egyptian filmmaker jehane noujaim. it was four years ago this month when oscar grant, the 22-year old bay area resident, was shot to death by a bart police officer on new year's day in 2009. a new dramatic film portrays the last day of oscar's life. >> to you have plans for the night? >> nothing major. head out to the city. train don't you take the out there? that way you guys can drink and hang out and not have to worry about anything. >> getting over there and getting back? >> no traffic, either. you know it is going to be crazy going and coming back. >> we might take it. >> we will speak with first-time filmmaker, 26-year-old ryan coogler who worked as a social worker to juvenile detention center in san francisco. then, "who is dayani cristal?" >> a new film featuring the mexican actor gael garcia bernal examines the story of a migrant who died in the arizona desert in 2010. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i
is in cairo for us. let's start here. last time we talked about several cities being a tinderbox. we have laid out the story. the national defense council, meant to discuss the security situation in the country. what can out of that meeting? >> it was made clear that the events in egypt at the moment will fall under the control of the national defense council. this is a body composed of government ministers and representatives from both houses of parliament, as well as military commanders and the head of military intelligence. this body has not been seen operating publicly since it was created last year. very clearly, it is the supervising was happening on the ground. rejected by most of the opposition movement, claiming that they reserve the right to impose a state of emergency in particular areas, should they wish to do so. there was no threat to do so immediately, but they made it clear that they would use the option if the situation on the ground continued to deteriorate. >> we want to get more on the situation from cairo, we have live pictures. i was following you on twitter yesterday, an
importantly to the protection of religious freedom. >> two more people died in cairo on wednesday in clashes between police and demonstrators. the death toll has now reached 50 in a week of protests. two years after a revolution swept morsi's predecessor from power. berlin has criticized his recent attempts to consolidate power is, and his opponents in the german capital were warning of a new dictatorship and egypt. >> our correspondent has been following the president's visit for us. does morsi get any of the investment and all of that that he has been looking for? >> i think you are right. i think he came to berlin looking for a bit -- investments and development aid, but wt he got i fear from his perspective from angela merkel was a cold shoulder. effectively, the chancellor told him to go back home and put his house in order, and also in terms of providing a stable backdrop, a stable framework. after all, until not long ago, as many as 1 million german tourists were going to egypt each and every year. another interesting point -- it is a fact that the imf has promised to grant egypt a lo
motors? >> it is 12:00 noon in london, 2:00 p.m. in cairo, 10:00 in the morning in santa maria, where families of those who died in the nightclub fire have begun the grim business of the identifying the bodies of their loved ones. an investigation has started, but there is a suspicion that the fire may have begun when a rock band let off the fireworks. raising troubling questions for the authorities, not least of which is a if the safety is fit for the country set to host the world cup and the olympics in a few years. >> some of the best and brightest of brazil, science students, so many promising lives cut short in one of the world's deadliest nightclub fires. >> i feel a lot of sadness, i lost my son in this threat -- in this tragedy. >> the blaze began when a member of the band with a flair. there was panic as deadly fumes began to suffocate. >> i was dancing with my friend and the music stopped. my friends started pushing me and yelling. that is when the confusion started. >> witnesses say that security guards prevented people from leaving without paying and there were no other si
the future, giving hope for the future. >> events like this in the desert north of cairo attracted more than 50,000 egyptian christians and four days of prayer. >> american christians are concerned about brothers and sisters in christ. >> we definitely need your prayers. lord tells us to pray for one another. you pray for us and we will pray for you. >> you can look at coptic history with a sense of sadness of the continuous decline. you can look at it to the sense of how the hands of god has protected his people and made them survive through everything they have been through. >> gary lane, cbn news, cairo. >> thanks, gary, a radical muslim group in nigeria killed 800 people this year. the al-qaeda-linked fightered declared war on christians carrying out multiple attacks on christian homes and churches, including a devastating car bomb on christmas day one year ago. as george thomas reports there are calls for revenge, also forgiveness. ♪ >> it was a beautiful day, we came to church to celebrate the birth of jesus christ. people started coming as early as 6:00 in the morning. it was going
covered downtown cairo with plumes of smoke. .hey've not held back a general was held hostage. these angry young men and women -- the opposition blocked -- the national front had six specific demands starting with the formation of a government and cancelling all the consequences of the desperation. >> was urged to stand his ground. >> no person or front has the power to force anything on the elected president. nobody should be able to implement any agendas or conditions for him to follow. >> thousands in this city are trying to force the curfew that was imposed. once again the president finds himself in a difficult position. this time the challenge restoring faith in his leadership at a time many people feel he has broken his promises one too many times. >> we are live in cairo. the defense minister has been talking pretty strong warnings. >> it was an unprecedented statement from the defense minister. field marshall may statement in which he said the ongoing dispute between forces in the country could lead to the collapse of the state. this is a very strong warning. he said the ongoing --
at least 50 lifts the last three days. the violent protests in cairo and several other industries been the biggest challenge yet toz mohamed morsi's government. let's go to cairo for the latest. >> reporter: it is mohamed morsi's biggest test as president of this country. on one hand, an increasing security vacuum across the country, on the other, a political crisis with the country's political parties. tonight, in an address to the nation, he delivered a strong warping. even burying the dead in egypt is now deadly. today in port sayyid, a day after 37 people were killed in protests, thousands walked to mourn them. the grief and prayer turned into fear and chaos. this amateur video, which we couldn't independently ver, if i reportsedly shows the moment the clashes with police turned deadly. meantime, as thousands mourned in port said, others fought in cairo, alexandria and suez. tonight, the country's embattled president, mohamed morsi, addressed the nation, declaring a state of emergency and imposing a curfew in the cities with the worst fighting. the country's powerful military is ba
control after violent protests erupt in three major cities there. we'll have a live report from cairo. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at "30 rock" in new york city. >>> in a rare joint interview on cbs's "60 minutes," president obama sat alongside his departing secretary of state, hillary clinton, a one-time political rival who he now describes as one of his close advisors. she says she won't have a run in 2016. neither obama nor clinton were eager to look that far ahead. >> what's the -- i have to ask you, what's the date of the expiration on this endorsement. >> steve, i know -- >> i have to ask that question. i mean, come on. you're sitting here together. everybody in town is talking about it already and the interview -- and this is taking place. >> you know, steve, i've got to tell you, you guys in the press are incore ridgeable. i was literally inaugurated four days ago and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> and i am, as you know, steve, i'm still in politics and i'm forbidden from hearing these. >> if she wants this job, it will be intere
the famed suez canal. cairo also has erupted into violence. dozens of people have been killed. our ben wedeman is live in cairo for us. this is democracy, and democracy, ben, is not pretty. but at the same time, why is it that we're seeing so much violence instead of a political action to try to change the government that's currently in place? that was elected by them? >> reporter: i think it's important to keep in mind that this is a revolution. revolutions don't last 18 days. they can go on for years. this country was essentially under military rule for about 60 years. therefore, when all the controls go, when people take to the streets and fight against the military and against the police, forces are let loose that are very hard to control. there is political movement going on. there are politicians talking with the government trying to resolve this crisis over a variety of things. over the new constitution. over the actions of the muslim brotherhood since it came to power. there are many young people who have discovered the power of numbers, the power of crowds, their ability to fi
have a flag in cairo where demonstrations took place at the embassy. another picture in jordan of the united states embassy where protests took place. in bahrain over 2,000 protesters burned numerous united states and israeliing ins. again, at embassy. in kuwait, embassy 500 demonstrators chaned "obama we are osama bin laden." the flag again and fineally in libya, the flag was blown and carried through the streets this, as well. my question, madam secretary, were you aware of the d.o.d. report prior to the terrorist attack in benghazi? >> i was certainly aware of a number of reports from threw our government. i don't know the specific report you refer to. there were d.o.d. reports and intelligence and community reports and state department reports talking about the decreasing or the increasing threat enenvironment in eastern libya. that was what we were trying to address with the libyans. remember, the election in july in libya brought to victory what we would consider moderates, people who had a very different view of the kind of future certainly than al qaeda or the militants
-- picture taken in cairo at the u.s. embassy where demonstrations took place. another picture in jordan at the u.s. embassy where protests took place. in bahrain over 2000 protesters who burned numerous u.s. and israeli flags again at the embassy. in kuwait chanting obama we are all osama. the flag again. and in libya, the flag was carried through the streets there as well. my question, madam secretary, is were you aware of this d.o.d. report prior to the terrorist attack in benghazi? >> well, i was certainly aware of a number of reports from throughout our government. i don't know of the specific one you're referring to. there were d.o.d. reports, community reports, state department reports talking about the decreasing -- or the increasing threat environment in eastern libya. that is what we were trying to establish with the libyans. the election in july brought to victory what we would consider moderates. people who had a very different view of the kind of future than certainly al qaeda or these militants have. but there's going to be a struggle in this region and the united states ha
in tunisia, where the protesters are outside. in addition i have a flag, the picture was taken in cairo, at a u.s. embassy where demonstrations took place. another picture in jordan at the u.s. embassy where protests took place. in bahrain, over 2,000 protesters who burned numerous u.s. and israeli flags, again at the embassy. in kuwait, u.s. embassy 500 demonstrators chanting obama, we are all osama. again. and again, a flag flown and carried through the streets as well. in libya. my question, madam secretary, were you aware of the d.o.d. report prior to the terrorist attack in benghazi? >> i was certainly aware of a number of reports from throughout our government. i don't know of the specific one you were referring to. there were d.o.d. reports, state department reports, talking about the decreasing or the increasing threat environment in eastern libya. that was what we were trying to address with the libyans. and remember the election in july in libya brought to victory what we would consider moderate people who had a very different view of it than al qaeda or other groups. the unit
. chris really took to this. i can picture him in the markets of cairo, joking with vendors, smiling, enjoying their stories. chris was chief stevens gone global. [ laughter] >> but chris was also a perfect blend of father and mother. a deep appreciation of history, newspapers, beauty. gilbert and sullivan, p.g. woodhouse and nature. like dad he loved to experience through hiking, mount tam, at lan, barvarian alps. one summer i had a job at signal mountain lodge in the tee tons. he came to visit and read nick adams stories. now is now is now. inspired, he signed on for a job. long after school chris was still there, immersed in the culture. not only hiking, fishing and camping but hunting elk. hard to believe. one of the last times i was with chris we took a long run through the trails of walnut creek. he was reading a book of how to keep running as we enter our later years. giving me pep talks in how to drag myself out of bed in cold, dark mornings for that run. i was inspired. through mom he learned the value of visiting a foreign country. the importance of talking to people in the
derailed just south of cairo early otuesday. at least 19 people were killed and over 100 injured. the train was traveling from central egypt to cairo carrying 1,300 soldiers. the last two cars detached and derailed. one of the soldiers said there were problems before the accident. he said the train kept stopping. a hospital official near the site said many victims were in critical condition. two months ago a train and a school bus collided in the central province of assiut. over 50 people die prident mohad moi appointed a new transport minister this month to overhaul the railway system. >>> executives at japanese manufacturing firms are starting to get excited. economic conditions could be tilting in their favor. ai uchida joins us now from the business desk. so ai, what's changing for manufacturers? >> catherine, it could be the weakening yen. you might remember it started to weaken last november. japanese government officials just released data for that month that showed that companies are investing in more equipment for thselves. it's machinery orders, a key economic indicator on corpora
's embattled president, bashar al assad. nbc's stephanie gosk monitoring developments for us tonight from cairo. stephanie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. bashar al assad does not show up in public much these days. his last speech was back in june. he spoke live today to his country, conceding nothing and as defiant as ever. in a packed opera theater in damascus, supporters jumped to their feet and cheered for syria's president. "we will die for you," they shouted. the syrian leader did propose a new political solution to syria's conflict, a cease-fire, national reconciliation. eventually, a new constitution. but most of his address seemed to prove just how far off that possibility really is. he called the opposition terrorists, puppets of the west. assad said his government will not negotiate until regional countries stop funding rebel fighters. >> he still thinks that much of the opposition is fundamentally illegitimate. he blames them for the violence. he is trying to remind his foreign sponsors in places like iran and russia that he still is interested in a fight. >> repor
has been scared. they will be retried. in cairo, those we spoke to were skeptical about the outcome. >> they will be speared somehow. we have no faith anymore. so many former regimes have been set free. >> the judiciary is functioning at the speed of a turtle. it has been two years. those who died had not been redeemed. >> lawyers, activists, and the judge were complaining about the weak case put forward by the prosecution. things could change in the new trial. a new committee says there is fresh evidence against mubarak and his aides. a new prosecution has been given the report. much of what is to come will depend on the content of this new report, details of which are made to the public. for almost two years, many egyptians have complained that justice had eluded this. the police force has not been reforms. multiple rounds of violence have not been held accountable. >> there is consistent violence outside the courtroom. there are concerns the new trials could serve their emotions at a time when the country is struggling to fix its economy. al jazeera comic cairo. >> survivors have
recently passed away in cairo, in june, actually. she was not only a poet, she was luminous and free-thinking pioneer in establishing the theory of what has come to be known as free verse in arabic poetry. in addition to her extensive laments on oppression of women and melancholy. she left. no cheek turned pale, no lip trembled. the door did not hear the story of her death. no window curtain overflowed with sorrow and gloom to follow the tomb until it disappeared. the moon lamenting its depression. the night surrendered itself without worry to the morning. the lights brought the voice of the milk girls, the fasting and the moaning of a starved cat of which nothing remained except bone. the fussing of salesmen, the struggle of life, kids threw stones at one another in the middle of the road while dirty water flooded the avenue and the wind toyed with gates and roof tops, alone in a state of semi oblivion. . >> on the day al-matarazzo street was bombed, did you notice how quickly it folded in itself? or the broken tea cups and coffee-stained saucers, the gray matter, and just before t
cairo. people took to the streets in other cities. demonstrators attacked police trying to protect government buildings. inevitable retaliation by security forces reminiscent of the protests of the past caused new anchor. -- new anger. this evening, there is news of more clashes in cairo and elsewhere. more injuries and no deaths as well. a historic day, but this is no celebration. a lot of parallels have been drawn between what happened today and two years ago. a lot of the slogans in tahrir square were remarkably similar. in the city of suez, there were five us today. two years ago, there were three deaths that ultimately toppled the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between th
the fledglingly democracy from spinning out of control. we have more from cairo. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. egypt's president mohamed morsi delivered a stern and angry warning in an address to the nation. the president declared a state of emergency in three of the country's largest cities in the eastern particular partly suez. he's also imposing a curfew to try to help restore security in those cities that have seen the most intense fighting. the military has been deployed in some of those cities and asking for more power. the ability to arrest civilians. that's is going ring alarm bells among many human rights activists. here in cairo protests continued for a fourth straight night between riot police and demonstrators bent on trying to get president mohamed morsi to resign from power and more importantly cancel a constitution that's been widely considered as controversial. nonetheless the president is pushing ahead with meetings today in the presidential palace. he's expected to meet with leading members of the political opposition. members of the political opposition said t
-- more violence in egypt. police and protesters have clashed in cairo and the city of port said on day five of the latest crisis to hit the country. >> it is becoming a test of the authority of president mohammad morrissey and his muslim brotherhood. he announced the state in emergency -- president mohammed morrissey -- mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. he announced a state of emergency in three areas. >> they have asked all egyptians to express themselves peacefully. >> on monday, cairo saw yet more street battles between protesters and street forces -- security forces. tension is high after the weekend cost deadly violence. the situation has been further polarized -- the weekend's deadly violence. the situation has been further polarized by the state of emergency. dozens of people were killed. president mohammed morrisse -- t morsi gave the soldiers power to arrest citizens. he made a plea for active -- national dialogue, but said he will protect public and private property. demonstrators took to the streets elsewhere in egypt on monday. imports i need, hundreds ignored -- i
this spring. >>> violent protests threaten a new government. we're going to go cairo coming up. >>> plus, new hope for a soldier who lost four limbs fighting for his country. we'll bring you an update next. with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? or double miles on every purchase, every day! all stations come over to mission a no go call. go. this is for real this time. we are on step seven point two one two. we have entered our two minute hold. cabin venting has been inhibited. copy that. sys two, verify and lock. command is locked. flight computer state has entered auto idyll. three, two, one. the falcon 9 has launched. preparing for nose cone separation
have time to correct it. we have to correct it. we will correct it. >> it is not just cairo. people took to the streets in other cities. demonstrators attacked police trying to protect government buildings. inevitable retaliation by security forces reminiscent of the protests of the past caused new anchor. -- new anger. this evening, there is news of more clashes in cairo and elsewhere. more injuries and no deaths as well. a historic day, but this is no celebration. a lot of parallels have been drawn between what happened today and two years ago. a lot of the slogans in tahrir square were remarkably similar. in the city of suez, there were five us today. two years ago, there were three deaths that ultimately toppled the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 379 (some duplicates have been removed)

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